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The Best Weather-Forecast Website for Landscape Photographers

Updated: Feb 14, 2021


Figure 1. (Click to enlarge) Stormy sunrise over the East Fork of the Cimarron River, Uncompahgre Wilderness, Colorado.
Figure 1. (Click to enlarge) Stormy sunrise over the East Fork of the Cimarron River, Uncompahgre Wilderness, Colorado.

Deciding when to shoot is always agonizing for me. I need to get into the field to shoot new images, but I hate getting skunked and feeling like I wasted time that I could have spent more productively in the office. And since the quality of the images I come home with is often largely determined by the weather, obtaining an up-to-date, accurate weather forecast is critical.


The best forecasts I've found for my purposes are the point forecasts produced by the National Weather Service. Point forecasts are very specific forecasts for very small regions, sometimes as small as a few square miles. Even more important for a mountain photographer is that the forecast takes elevation into account. In flat country, the forecast may not vary much over distances of 10 or 20 miles, but it can vary tremendously in the mountains. The summit of 14,259-foot Longs Peak, for example, might as well be on another planet when you're comparing its weather to that of Denver 9,000 feet below.


To obtain a point forecast, start by visiting https://www.weather.gov/. In the top left corner, enter a city and state or a ZIP code in the search box (figure 2). The forecast page that opens will be specific to that city, of course, and that may be all you need. If your destination is actually a nearby national park or wilderness area, however, locate the map in the lower right corner of the page. Scroll across the map to your destination, zoom in to be sure you’re clicking on exactly the right spot, and click to receive a very specific forecast for the region marked by the small green square on the map. Directly beneath the map you'll find the exact latitude, longitude, and elevation of the forecast zone. Depending on exactly where you clicked, you may also find the distance and direction from the nearest city or other geographic landmark.